WA-List

Washington Athletes in Sochi

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Sports & Recreation

See also our 2014 RESULTS LIST

Washingtonians can root for more than a dozen local athletes during the Sochi Winter Olympics in 2014.  The contingent is lead by J.R. Celski, the speed skater from Federal Way who won two bronze medals in the 2010 Vancouver games.  For Woodinville’s Christian Niccum, Sochi will be his third Olympic games.  Holly Brooks, Patrick Deneen, and Torin Koos are competing in their second.  Among the other Washingtonians are three from the Methow Valley, two of which are siblings.  Three local athletes are competing for other countries!

Below are the 2014 Olympians with a Washington connection, their specific events, and the dates of their events’ medal finals.  (Entries and dates are subject to change.)  May their gym bags be a medal or two heavier when they return home.  Best wishes to all!

US OLYMPIC ATHLETES FROM WASHINGTON STATE, 2014

Figure Skating

  •  Ashley Wagner, 21, of Seabeck, trained in Tacoma.
    Events: Team Ice Dance Free Dance (Feb 9), Ladies Free Skating (Feb 20)

Hockey

  •  T.J. Oshie, 27, born in Mount Vernon, raised in Everett.
    Event: Men’s Hockey (Feb 23)

Luge

  •  *Christian Niccum, 36, lives in Woodinville.
    Events: Luge Doubles (Feb 12), Luge Team Relay (Feb 13)

Skiing, Cross-Country

  •  Erik Bjornsen, 22, born and lives in Winthrop; attended Liberty Bell High School.
    Events: Men’s 15 km Skiathlon (Feb 9), Men’s Sprint Free (Feb 11), Men’s 15km Classic (Feb 14), Men’s 4x10km Relay (Feb 16), Men’s Team Sprint Classic (Feb 19)
  •  Sadie Bjornsen, 24, born in Omak, grew up in Winthrop.
    Events: Women’s 7.5km Skiathlon (Feb 8), Women’s Indiv. Sprint Free (Feb 11), Women’s 10km Classic (Feb 13), Women’s 4x5km Relay (Feb 15), Women’s Team Sprint Classic (Feb 19)
  •  *Holly Brooks, 31, born and raised in Seattle, skied often at Snoqualmie Pass, attended Whitman College.
    Events: Women’s 7.5km Skiathlon (Feb 8), Women’s Indiv. Sprint Free (Feb 11), Women’s 10km Classic (Feb 13), Women’s 4x5km Relay (Feb 15), Women’s Team Sprint Classic (Feb 19)
  • Roberto Carcelen, 43, lives in Seattle.
    Events: Men’s 15km Classic (Feb 14)
  •  Brian Gregg, 29, born and raised in Winthrop; attended Liberty Bell High School.
    Events: Men’s 15 km Skiathlon (Feb 9), Men’s Sprint Free (Feb 11), Men’s 15km Classic (Feb 14), Men’s 4x10km Relay (Feb 16), Men’s Team Sprint Classic (Feb 19)
  •  *Torin Koos, 33, lives in Leavenworth, attended Cascade High School.
    Events: Men’s 15 km Skiathlon (Feb 9), Men’s Sprint Free Finals (Feb 11), Men’s 15km Classic (Feb 14), Men’s 4x10km Relay (Feb 16), Men’s Team Sprint Classic (Feb 19)

Skiing, Freestyle

  •  *Patrick Deneen, 26, born in Redmond, grew up and was homeschooled in Cle Elum.
    Event: Men’s Moguls (Feb 10)
  •  Angeli Van Laanen, 28, born in Bellingham.
    Event: Women’s Halfpipe (Feb 20)
  • Amy Sheehan, 27, lives in Wenatchee.
    Events: Women’s Halfpipe (Feb 20)

Snowboarding

  • Vic Wild, 27, born and raised in White Salmon.
    Events: Men’s Parallel Giant Slalom (Feb 19), Men’s Slalom (Feb 22)

Speed Skating, Short Track

  •  *J. R. Celski, 23, grew up in Federal Way; attended Todd Beamer High School.
    Events: 1500m (Feb 10), 1000m (Feb 15), 500m (Feb 21), 5000m Relay (Feb 21)

* Athlete has been to the Olympics before.

Note: The definition of a Washington athlete is necessarily squishy.  Brian Gregg, for instance, was born in Winthrop but now lives in Minneapolis; Koos was born in Minneapolis and now lives in Leavenworth. Three others live in Salt Lake City or Anchorage these days.  Three are competing for other countries — including Vic Wild. Wild is a native of White Salmon, WA, but, due to his marriage to a Russian Olympian, is making a go of it on his wife’s team.  Most listed grew up in Washington and took up their sport here.

SOURCE: We scoured several websites — primarily the athlete biography sections of the Team USA and the NBC Olympics websites — and some individual athlete webpages.

LOGO of the United States Olympic Team logo is used here with permission of the USOC.

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Pete Carroll Joins an Elite Coaches Club

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Sports & Recreation

Only three football head coaches have won national titles at both the college and professional level of the sport. That is no simple feat considering the great number of teams and the vast differences in organization and team-building dynamics.  With the Seattle Seahawks win in Super Bowl XLVIII, Pete Carroll became the newest member of that elite club.

Here is the very short list and the seasons that earned the national titles.

 

HEAD COACHES WITH NATIONAL TITLES IN BOTH COLLEGE FOOTBALL and THE NFL

Pete Carroll (born 1951)

COLLEGE YEAR NFL
Southern California Trojans

  • Season: 12-1
  • Rose Bowl win (Jan 1, 2004)
2003
Southern California Trojans

  • Season: 11-0
  • Orange Bowl win (Jan 4, 2005)
2004
2013 SEATTLE SEAHAWKS

  • Season: 13-3
  • Post-season: 3-0
  • Super Bowl win (Feb 2, 2014)

Barry Switzer (born 1937)

COLLEGE YEAR NFL
Oklahoma Sooners

  • Season 11-0
1974
Oklahoma Sooners

  • Season: 11-1
  • Orange Bowl win (Jan 1, 1976)
1975
Oklahoma Sooners

  • Season: 11-1
  • Orange Bowl win (Jan 1, 1986)
1985
1995 Dallas Cowboys

  • Season: 12-4
  • Postseason: 3-0
  • Super Bowl win (Jan 28, 1996)

Jim Johnson (born 1943)

COLLEGE YEAR NFL
Miami Hurricanes

  • Season: 12-0
  • Orange Bowl win (Jan 1, 1988)
1987
1992 Dallas Cowboys

  • Season: 13-3
  • Postseason 3-0
  • Super Bowl win (Jan 31, 1993)
1993 Dallas Cowboys

  • Season: 12-4
  • Postseason: 3-0
  • Super Bowl win (Jan 30, 1994)

SEE ALSO: World Championships by Seattle Teams

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World Championships by Seattle Teams

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Sports & Recreation

It’s going be a party all over the Northwest this week after the Seattle Seahawks dominated the Denver Broncos in today’s Super Bowl XLVIII, 43-8. They led the game beginning with the safety 12 seconds into the game. (Twelve seconds; the Seahawks are awash in 12s!)

Seattle hasn’t claimed a world championship in men’s pro sports since 1979, so this is sweet!  Here’s a quick list of all the titles going back to an oft-forgotten hockey championship in 1917. We included the two women’s professional team titles, too.

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS BY SEATTLE TEAMS

Year Champion League Sport Team defeated
2014  Seattle Seahawks  NFL  Football  Denver Broncos
  • Super Bowl (Feb 2): Seattle 43, Denver 8
2010  Seattle Storm  WNBA  Basketball  Atlanta Dream
  • Game 1 (Sep 12): Seattle 79, Atlanta 77
  • Game 2 (Sep 14): Seattle 87, Atlanta 84
  • Game 3 (Sep 16): Seattle 87. Atlanta 84
2004  Seattle Storm  WNBA  Basketball  Connecticut Sun
  • Game 1 (Oct 8): Connecticut 68, Seattle 64
  • Game 2 (Oct 10): Seattle 67, Connecticut 65
  • Game 3 (Oct 12): Seattle 74, Connecticut 60
1979  Seattle SuperSonics  NBA  Basketball  Washington Bullets
  • Game 1 (May 20): Washington 99, Seattle 97
  • Game 2 (May 24): Seattle 92, Washington 82
  • Game 3 (May 27): Seattle 105, Washington 95
  • Game 4 (May 29): Seattle 114, Washington 112
  • Game 5 (Jun 1): Seattle 97, Washington 93
1917  Seattle Metropolitans  NHL  Hockey  Montreal Canadiens
  • Game 1 (Mar 17): Montreal 8, Seattle 4
  • Game 2 (Mar 20): Seattle 6, Montreal 1
  • Game 3 (Mar 23): Seattle 4, Montreal 1
  • Game 4 (Mar 26): Seattle 9, Montreal 1

SEE ALSO: Pete Carroll Joins an Elite Coaches Club

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Review: Full Rip 9.0

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Review

A powerful Northwest earthquake is only a matter of time.  That’s not quite news any more, but it is still a relatively recent development in the popular awareness of the region. The old perception that the Washington and Oregon were in a seismically quiet suburb of shaky California was dispatched barely a generation ago.  It took slowly accumulated research to repaint the picture of our local geology.  And the more studies that scientists published, the more calamitous the view of our region’s past — and future — appeared to become.

FullRip 9.0: The Next Big Earthquake in the Pacific Northwest by Sandi Doughton (Sasquatch Books, 2013) looks at that past and that future.  In text that is as readable as it is gripping, Doughton rolls out the hazardous story one topic at a time. She explains how isolated detective work among long-dead trees on Washington’s coast was combined with Native American stories of ground-shaking and flooding, then matched with archived accounts of Japanese tsunamis, and studies of undersea trench avalanches a hundred miles offshore.  The big picture explanation for all of this was a giant no one previously knew: the 700-mile-long Cascadia Subduction Zone which will rip along its length and pack a prolonged punch that make California earthquakes seem like minor nuisances.  Cascadia is not only capable of such devastating power; it has exercised it again and again.

Doughton goes beyond Cascadia, however, and shares insights on the rest of Washington’s underground hazards. She describes the newly discovered Cascadia quake of 1700 and the historic quakes of 1872, 1949, and 1965. They were all hints of what is likely to come.  The emerging view of our landscape, with wrenching scars long-hidden by glaciation, erosion, and our rich Northwest vegetation, includes a complex network of faults — particularly the Seattle Fault — that could amplify the effects of future shaking.  The 2001 Nisqually Earthquake was significant, for instance, not only for its immediate impact but for the science that emerged as it resonated across the region.

The craft of geological science is at the core of Doughton’s book.  She doesn’t merely relay summaries cribbed from published scientific findings; she tells how the researchers discovered their evidence. Scientific fieldwork sometimes requires walking in coastal muck to sample ancient trees, or digging a trench in a residential neighborhood along the Seattle Fault, or noticing a thin line on a LIDAR map and traipsing through a forest to see it in real life. Those stories are weaved into the author’s narrative.

The book concludes with options for individual and community preparations before the next big one.

A 2011 book, Cascadia’s Fault by Jerry Thompson, documented the same subject.  Both are excellent books that we enthusiastically recommend to Washington readers, but Doughton’s writing is perhaps the more approachable and engaging of the two.

THE BOOK: FullRip 9.0: The Next Big Earthquake in the Pacific Northwest by Sandi Doughton was published by Sasquatch Books in 2013.  The paperback edition will be released in September, 2014.

IMAGES: The cover art and the map of western Washington faults are shown her courtesy of Sasquatch Books.

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Sunrise, Sunset

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Geography & Geology

Whether you can see it or not, the sun rises over Washington everyday. Honest. Sometimes your only clue is the brightening of clouds. If you’re lucky, you might catch a glimpse of the old orb itself.

We thought we’d step into the role of a Northwest almanac by creating a perpetual calendar of sunrises and sunsets — a list of times on a weekly basis throughout the year. We’ve been wanting one of these for years, so we’re as pleased as anyone that we finally got around to making it ourselves. We chose six geographically diverse cities so you can extrapolate times for your location by picking cities on either side of you and averaging their data, skewing toward the closer city. It might not give you a precise time but it should land you within a very few minutes.1

Once you know when they happen, we hope you enjoy every sunrise and sunset you’re lucky enough to experience.

Sunrise times are AM; sunsets are PM. Times displayed in italics are Pacific Daylight Time (PDT); all other times are Pacific Standard Time (PST).  Two non-header rows in the table are in bold type. Those dates fall during the weeks2 we transition between PST and PDT. Times in those rows are displayed as PST, so add one hour to the times if the specific day for which you’re calculating is daylight time.

SUNRISE AND SUNSET TIMES FOR 6 CITIES IN WASHINGTON STATE

Westport Seattle Wenatchee Spokane Bellingham Vancouver
rise set rise set rise set rise set rise set rise set
JAN 1 8:02 4:39 7:58 4:29 7:49 4:21 7:38 4:09 8:03 4:25 7:51 4:38
JAN 8 8:01 4:46 7:56 4:36 7:48 4:29 7:37 4:16 8:01 4:32 7:50 4:45
JAN 15 7:57 4:55 7:53 4:45 7:44 4:38 7:33 4:25 7:58 4:42 7:47 4:53
JAN 22 7:52 5:02 7:47 4:55 7:38 4:48 7:28 4:35 7:51 4:52 7:42 5:03
JAN 29 7:45 5:15 7:40 5:06 7:31 4:59 7:20 4:46 7:43 5:03 7:35 5:13
FEB 5 7:36 5:26 7:30 5:17 7:22 5:09 7:11 4:57 7:34 5:15 7:27 5:23
FEB 12 7:25 5:35 7:20 5:28 7:11 5:20 7:00 5:08 7:23 5:26 7:17 5:33
FEB 19 7:14 5:47 7:08 5:39 7:00 5:31 6:48 5:19 7:10 5:38 7:06 5:43
FEB 26 7:01 5:58 6:55 5:50 6:47 5:42 6:36 5:30 6:57 5:49 6:54 5:53
MAR 5 6:48 6:08 6:42 6:00 6:34 5:52 6:22 5:41 6:44 6:00 6:42 6:03
MAR 12 6:35 6:18 6:28 6:11 6:20 6:03 6:08 5:51 6:29 6:11 6:29 6:13
MAR 19 7:21 7:28 7:14 7:21 7:06 7:13 6:54 7:01 7:15 7:21 7:15 7:22
MAR 26 7:07 7:38 7:00 7:31 6:52 7:23 6:40 7:11 7:00 7:32 7:02 7:31
APR 2 6:54 7:47 6:46 7:41 6:38 7:33  6:26 7:21  6:45 7:42  6:49 7:40
APR 9 6:40 7:57 6:32 7:51  6:24 7:42  6:12 7:31  6:31 7:53  6:36 7:49
APR 16 6:27 8:06 6:18 8:01  6:11 7:52  5:59 7:41  6:17 8:03  6:23 7:58 
APR 23 6:14 8:16 6:06 8:10  5:58 8:02  5:46 7:51  6:04 8:14  6:11 8:08 
APR 30 6:03 8:26 5:54 8:20  5:46 8:12  5:34 8:01  5:51 8:24  6:00 8:17 
MAY 7 5:52 8:35 5:43 8:30  5:35 8:21  5:23 8:10  5:40 8:34  5:50 8:25 
MAY 14 5:43 8:44 5:33 8:39  5:26 8:30  5:13 8:20  5:30 8:44  5:41 8:34 
MAY 21 5:35 8:52 5:25 8:48  5:18 8:39  5:05 8:28  5:21 8:53  5:33 8:42 
MAY 28 5:28 9:00 5:18 8:55  5:11 8:47  4:59 8:36  5:14 9:01  5:27 8:49 
JUN 4 5:24 9:06 5:14 9:02  5:07 8:53  4:54 8:42  5:10 9:07  5:23 8:55 
JUN 11 5:22 9:11 5:11 9:07  5:04 8:58  4:52 8:47  5:07 9:13  5:21 9:00 
JUN 18 5:21 9:14 5:11 9:10 5:04 9:01 4:51 8:51 5:06 9:16 5:21 9:03
JUN 25 5:23 9:15 5:13 9:11  5:06 9:02  4:53 8:52  5:08 9:17  5:23 9:04 
JUL 2 5:27 9:14 5:16 9:10  5:09 9:01  4:56 8:51  5:12 9:16  5:26 9:03 
JUL 9 5:32 9:11 5:22 9:07  5:14 8:58  5:02 8:48  5:17 9:13  5:31 9:00 
JUL 16 5:38 9:06 5:28 9:02  5:21 8:53  5:08 8:43  5:24 9:07  5:37 8:56 
JUL 23 5:46 8:59 5:36 8:55  5:29 8:46  5:16 8:36  5:32 9:00  5:44 8:49 
JUL 30 5:54 8:51 5:44 8:46  5:37 8:38  5:25 8:27  5:41 8:51  5:52 8:41 
AUG 6 6:03 8:41 5:53 8:36  5:46 8:28  5:34 8:17  5:51 8:40  6:00 8:32 
AUG 13 6:12 8:30 6:03 8:25  5:55 8:16  5:43 8:05  6:00 8:28  6:09 8:21 
AUG 20 6:21 8:18 6:12 8:12  6:04 8:04  5:52 7:53  6:10 8:15  6:17 8:10 
AUG 27 6:30 8:05 6:21 7:59  6:14 7:51  6:02 7:40  6:20 8:02  6:26 7:57 
SEP 3 6:39 7:52 6:31 7:46  6:23 7:37  6:11 7:26  6:30 7:48  6:34 7:44 
SEP 10 6:48 7:38 6:40 7:31  6:32 7:23  6:20 7:12  6:40 7:33  6:43 7:31 
SEP 17 6:57 7:24 6:49 7:17  6:42 7:09  6:30 6:57  6:50 7:18  6:52 7:18 
SEP 24 7:06 7:10 6:59 7:03  6:51 6:55  6:39 6:43  7:00 7:03  7:00 7:04 
OCT 1 7:15 6:56 7:09 6:48  7:00 6:41  6:49 6:29  7:10 6:49  7:09 6:51 
OCT 8 7:25 6:42 7:18 6:34  7:10 6:27  6:59 6:15  7:21 6:32  7:18 6:37 
OCT 15 7:35 6:29 7:28 6:21  7:20 6:13  7:09 6:01  7:30 6:20  7:27 6:25 
OCT 22 7:45 6:17 6:39 6:08  7:30 6:01  7:19 5:49  7:41 6:07  7:37 6:13 
OCT 29 7:55 6:05 7:49 5:56  7:41 5:49  7:29 5:37  7:52 5:55  7:46 6:02 
NOV 5 7:05 4:55 7:00 4:46 6:51 4:38 6:40 4:26 7:03 4:43 6:56 4:52
NOV 12 7:15 4:45 7:10 4:36 7:02 4:29 6:51 4:16 7:14 4:33 7:06 4:43
NOV 19 7:25 4:38 7:21 4:28 7:12 4:21 7:01 4:09 7:25 4:25 7:16 4:36
NOV 26 7:35 4:32 7:30 4:23 7:22 4:15 7:11 4:03 7:35 4:19 7:25 4:31
DEC 3 7:44 4:29 7:39 4:19 7:30 4:12 7:20 3:59 7:44 4:15 7:33 4:28
DEC 10 7:51 4:28 7:47 4:18 7:38 4:10 7:27 3:58 7:52 4:14 7:40 4:27
DEC 17 7:57 4:29 7:52 4:19 7:44 4:11 7:33 3:59 7:58 4:14 7:46 4:28
DEC 24 8:00 4:32 7:56 4:22 7:47 4:15 7:37 4:02 8:02 4:18 7:49 4:31
DEC 31 8:02 4:38 7:58 4:27 7:49 4:20 7:38 4:08 8:03 4:23 7:51 4:36

1Sunrise and sunset times are dependent on east-west differences (just like time zones), directions somewhat close to north-south lines (due to the angle of the sun), elevation, and which year in the leap year cycle we’re in. We can’t account for all such factors with this simple list, so we’re seeking general estimates instead. After extrapolating, you should get times within a few minutes of accurate.  You might notice that the sun’s risings and settings take about 24-30 minutes to move across the state east (Spokane) to west (Westport) and, depending on the season, there is a 0 to 15 minute difference between north (Bellingham) and south (Vancouver) locations.

2The transition dates between standard and daylight time vary year to year, but always take place on the Sunday mornings between Mar 8-14 and Nov 1-7.

PHOTO of Mt Rainier Sunrise © Steve Campion, 2014

SOURCE: Sunrise and sunset times on this list are derived from 2014 ephemerides calculated by the US Naval Observatory. The times are reasonably accurate for any year, although they may vary by a minute or two within any leap year cycle.

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26.2 or more (2014 edition)

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Sports & Recreation

Last year’s ultra list was a hit, so we’re bringing it back for 2014.

And why not?  There are enough marathons, ultramarathons, and long distance trail runs in the state to keep your feet hurting all year long. In fact, if you plan your trips well you can hit an organized 26.2 miler or greater almost every weekend of the year.

Below are the organized runs we found to be 26.2 miles or more. In some cases, shorter courses (half-marathons, 30Ks, etc) are associated with these events but they’re incidental as far as this list is concerned. We were only interested in the long run.

If there’s an organized ultra in Washington not listed here, please leave a comment here or on the WA-List Facebook page. We’d love to hear about it.

Note about websites: We tried to identify the official race website or the sponsoring running club for each event. Some of the runs did not have their websites set up or updated for 2014 by our publishing deadline in January. We’ll update the list as best we can throughout the year.  Always double-check race websites for the latest before you commit your running shoes to anything.

MARATHONS, ULTRAMARATHONS, AND LONG-DISTANCE TRAIL RUNS IN WASHINGTON, 2014

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

*An asterisk means the listing was added, updated, or confirmed after the initial publication of this list.

PHOTO by Rich White.

SOURCES: We started this list with a dozen well-known marathons in early 2013, then expanded as discoveries warranted. Ultrarunner Linda Barton, pictured in the photo above, offered additional suggestions. Thank you, Linda!  Most of the information on this list came from the running organizations’ websites themselves, 2013-14.

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Where I Wandered: 2013

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Yada Yada

Publicly pointless, personally meaningful.  For the third year in a row, I’m tabulating my travels in a list.  No one cares where I wandered.  But I enjoy recalling the trips and activities and people I encounter each year.  This is my list.  Make your own!

After a rough, mostly home-bound 2012, I was back out on the road this year, bagging more than half of all Washington counties, and enjoying a long northeastern adventure. I’ve been to all 39 counties in Washington at least twice over the years.  In fact, I’ve been to 31 counties since WA-List launched two and a half years ago. (See my 2011 & 2012 lists.)

There’s plenty of interesting things to see and do and explore here. Our state has great variety in its landscapes, cityscapes, culture, art, agriculture, recreation, history, and people. It’s well worth wandering. That’s what I do. That’s what WA-List does. Thanks for traveling with me again this year! And if you’d like, please leave a comment saying where YOU wandered this year.

COUNTIES WHERE I SPENT MY TIME, 2013

1. Pierce 13. Stevens
2. Thurston 14. Lincoln
3. King 15. Cowlitz
4. Spokane 16. Lewis
5. Ferry 17. Kittitas
6. Whatcom 18. Pacific
7. Okanogan 19. Chelan
8. Skagit 20. Pend Oreille
9. Snohomish 21. Douglas
10. Grays Harbor 22. Island
11. San Juan 23. Clark
12. Grant

SOURCE: Off the top of my head … and in some of my bills.

PHOTO of a Douglas County road © Steve Campion

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Review: Vanishing Vancouver

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Review

“This city starts at Fifth Street.” It’s an accurate description. Downtown Vancouver grew from the Columbia River ferry landing a century and a half ago.  It was the logical point to walk off the boat from Portland and emerge in the business district.  Later it was the logical place to build the river bridge and the interstate highway.  Ah, there’s the rub.  Highways need space, and a large part of downtown was razed to let the cars flow through.  When you drive past Vancouver on Interstate 5 today, you are driving on the old downtown.  And what isn’t gone has greatly changed.

Vanishing Vancouver, a new book by Pat Jollota in the “Images of America” series, is a community photo album.  Like the people in an old family album, many of the landmarks in this book are no longer with us, and those that remain show a glint of familiarity but are noticeably different.  It’s fascinating to see the changes in buildings, streets, and vehicles.

If you’re familiar with Vancouver, you might recall some long-gone businesses like the Vancouver Brewery, Kaiser Shipyards, the Holland Restaurant, and Hi School Drug. You will also see early photos of an Igloo Restaurant, and Burgerville USA.

But need not be from Vancouver to be drawn into the history told on more than one hundred pages of captioned photos.  The city is the home of the earliest permanent European settlement in Washington.  It has served as an encampment for both British and American interests.  Ulysses Grant was stationed here before the Civil War and POWs were housed here during World War II.  Vancouver has hosted business and industry for nearly two hundred years.  History has continuously changed the landscape and the urban appearance.  The photographs in Jollota’s book captures many of the ghosts of this vanished past.

You’ll see images of the Columbia River — frozen.  (A plane is parked on the ice in one photo.)  You’ll see a parade of Prunarians. They were an important group 100 years ago, but seem rather curious from the perspective of 2013.  And you’ll learn about the Witness Tree (pictured at right) that served as the basis of the street grid and all property claims in town.

Whether buildings succumb to highways, civic developers, new technologies, fire, flood, or abandonment, all cities change.  It is very easy to not notice the changes that happen gradually.  It is far easier to forget things that have vanished completely.

Vanishing Vancouver, $21.99, Arcadia Publishing. Available at local retailers, online bookstores, or through Arcadia Publishing at www.arcadiapublishing.com or 888-313-2665.

One more thing:  Knowing of the modern city center west of Interstate 5, I was fascinated to see images of the older, now-missing downtown.  The pictures reminded me of Tumwater, another Washington city that yielded its central business district to I-5 pavement.  (See Tumwater by Heather Lockman and Carla Wulfsberg, another book in the “Images of America” series.)

PHOTOS: courtesy Arcadia Publishing.

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Top Dawgs

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Sports & Recreation

After an 8-4 bowl-bound season, Husky head coach Steve Sarkisian packed his bags.  He’s left the University of Washington football program after five years to return to USC where he previously worked as an assistant coach.  He didn’t even wait to find out which bowl game the Huskies would be playing.  Tally his five seasons at UW and you’ll find 34 wins, 29 losses, three postseason appearances, and one bowl win.  The 2013 Apple Cup win over the Cougars earned him the last  win he needed to rise on the all-time Husky win list (below) over Coach Rick Neuheisel who reached 33 wins in only 4 seasons about a decade ago.

The Huskies have played under 27 head coaches since their first games in 1892.  There may be no argument who among them was the most successful.  The late Don James trotted onto the filed at Husky Stadium 18 seasons and won almost three out of every four games.  The “Dawgfather” also had ten bowl game victories, one national championship, and a trophy case full of coaching awards.  His nearest rival might be Gil Dobie who coached nine undefeated seasons (and whom we featured in A Gloomy Success).  Yes, that really is a zero in his loss column!  John Cherberg, a beloved but not-so-successful coach, converted his popularity into a political career.  He served as lieutenant governor for the next three decades, 1957-1989!

Now that Sarkisian has coached his last Husky game, we wanted to see how he ranked on the all-time list.  He’s 7th in wins, and 15th in winning percentage.  Sarkaisian fared better than his two immediate predessors, Keith Gilbertson and Tyrone Willingham.  They were two of only eight UW coaches with losing records.

UW HUSKY FOOTBALL HEAD COACHES, IN ORDER OF MOST WINS

Rank Coach Year(s) Wins Losses Ties Percentage
 1  Don James  1975–1992  153  57  2  .726
 2  Jim Owens  1957–1974  99  82  6  .545
 3  James Phelan  1930–1941  65  37  8  .627
 4  Enoch Bagshaw  1921–1929  63  22  6  .725
 5  Gil Dobie  1908–1916  58  0  3  .975
 6  Jim Lambright  1993–1998  44  25  1  .636
 7  Steve Sarkisian  2009–2013  34  29  0  .540
 8  Rick Neuheisel  1999–2002  33  16  0  .673
 9  Ralph Welch  1942–1947  27  20  3  .570
 10  Howard Odell  1948–1952  23  25  2  .480
 11  James Knight  1902–1904  15  4  1  .775
 12  Tyrone Willingham  2005–2008  11  37  0  .229
 13  John Cherberg  1953–1955  10  18  2  .367
 14  Victor M. Place  1906–1907  8  5  6  .579
 15  Ralph Nichols  1895–1896, 1898  7  4  1  .625
 16  Keith Gilbertson  2003–2004  7  16  0  .304
 17  Claude J. Hunt  1917, 1919  6  3  1  .650
 18  Oliver Cutts  1905  5  2  2  .667
 19  Darrell Royal  1956  5  5  0  .500
 20  A. S. Jeffs  1899  4  1  1  .750
 21  Jack Wright  1901  3  3  0  .500
 22  W. B. Goodwin  1892–1893  2  4  1  .357
 23  Charles Cobb  1894  1  1  1  .500
 24  Tony Savage  1918  1  1  0  .500
 25  J. S. Dodge  1900  1  2  2  .400
 26  Carl L. Clemans  1897  1  2  0  .333
 27  Stub Allison  1920  1  5  0  .167

PHOTO of Steve Sarkisian by Bryan Veloso.

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The Congressional Nursery

Published by Steve Campion. Category: Politics & Government

Two very happy announcements arrived last week — both involving babies, congresswomen, and Washington State.  We have photos and a list.

The first happy news was an announcement from Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the U.S. Representative from Washington’s 5th Congressional District:

“Brian, Cole, Grace, and I are thrilled to welcome Brynn Catherine to our family!  (Born at 6:19 am on Nov. 24, weighing 7 lbs. 6 oz.) Nothing compares to the miracle of bringing a new  life into the world.  She’s beautiful and seems to be taking it all in stride.  Our hearts are full.”

Politicians have had children before, of course, but considering the overwhelming majority of office holders in American history have been male, it’s been a rarity for a member of Congress to give birth.  The first was Rep. Yvonne Burke of California.  Burke had a daughter on Nov 23, 1973 — 40 years and a day before McMorris Rodgers — while serving the first of her three congressional terms.  A generation passed before a second congresswoman became a mother in 1995.  Two more representatives gave birth the following year before another quiet decade in the congressional nursery slipped by.

McMorris Rodgers ended that quiet. You’ll notice the names Cole and Grace in the announcement above.  They were born to the representative and her husband Brian in 2007 and 2010 respectively.  So not only is the Spokane Republican the most recent congresswoman to have a baby, she was also the first to give birth twice — and now three times — while in office.  And she’s not exactly neglecting her day job.  McMorris Rodgers is in the House leadership, the chair of the House Republican Conference, and the highest ranking Republican woman in Congress.

The second happy news story involved Jaime Herrera Beutler, Republican U.S. Representative from Washington’s 3rd Congressional District.  Herrera Beutler had a baby this year herself, but she (Abigail) was born 12 weeks premature with Potter’s Syndrome, a serious and usually fatal condition that stifles the development of the kidneys and lungs.  Since her birth on July 15, Abigail has been living in a California hospital getting remarkable care.  She was born without kidneys and will need a transplant eventually, but thanks to an experimental procedure suggested by doctors at Johns Hopkins, she has not only beaten the odds and survived, but has gotten stronger.  Last week the “miracle baby” was released to an outpatient care facility and is expected to go home to Camas for the first time by Christmas.

So congratulations and best wishes to both Washington congresswomen and their families!  And welcome to the world, Abigail and Brynn.  Your moms have delivered four of the only twelve babies ever born to members of Congress.

BABIES BORN TO CONGRESSWOMEN

Birth Baby Name Congresswoman Life Party/ State Term
1. 1973 girl Autumn Roxanne Yvonne Braithwaite Burke 1932- D-CA 1973-79
2. 1995 girl Elizabeth Enid Greene Waldholtz 1958- R-UT 1995-97
3. 1996 girl Susan Ruby Susan Molinari 1958- R-NY 1990-97
4&5. 1996 boys Reece & Bennett Blanche Lincoln 1960- D-AR 1993-97*
6. 2007 boy Cole Cathy McMorris Rodgers 1969- R-WA 2005-
7. 2008 boy Henry Kirsten Gillibrand 1966- D-NY 2007-09*
8. 2008 boy Zachary Stephanie Herseth Sandlin 1970- D-SD 2004-11
9. 2009 boy Joaquin Linda Sánchez 1969- D-CA 2003-
10. 2010 girl Grace Blossom Cathy McMorris Rodgers   R-WA
11. 2013 girl Abigail Rose Jaime Herrera Beutler 1978- R-WA 2011-
12. 2013 girl Brynn Catherine Cathy McMorris Rodgers   R-WA

Six states.  Nine women.  Twelve babies.  Six boys, six girls.  Six baby Democrats (5 boys, 1 girl), six baby Republicans (1 boy, 5 girls).

*Lincoln later served in the Senate 1999-2011. Gillibrand later served in the Senate 2009-present.

PHOTOS: Both photos appearing in this article were posted on the congresswomen’s Facebook pages.  We intended to use official photos received from congressional offices when we conceived (no pun intended) and researched this list in June.  But mother-and-baby photos are so much better.  Duh!

SOURCES: The terms of office were taken from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.  Baby names and birth years were culled from official online biographies and dozens of news articles concerning the  various congresswomen.

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